4 household items you will want to keep away from your pet

4 household items you will want to keep away from your pet
Many poisons exist in our environment which our pets can be exposed to. The obvious ones, such as rat bait and slug bait display warnings about not eating them. Sadly our pets don’t read these. Some of these baits will be labelled as “pet friendly” as they contain a bitter-tasting agent that is designed to prevent pets from wanting to eat it – unfortunately the majority of pets will not be deterred and will still want to eat the bait.

Rat Bait

Our pets have enough clotting factors in their bodies to disguise the effects of eating rat bait for about two days. At this early stage, signs can be vague but tragically it can already be too late - bleeding from a microchip site; coughing; or limping after digging a hole are just some of the less-obvious signs we see resulting from rat bait ingestion in the prior 48 hours.

If you suspect your pet has eaten rat bait, it is important to seek veterinary advice immediately. The Veterinarian will want to know which type of bait you’re pet has eaten (if you have the packet bring it into the clinic with you) as it can change the treatment plan and course of medication. The vet will also want to know how long since your pet ate the poison.

Immediate treatment of rat bait poisoning can include making the pet vomit, intravenous fluid support, and blood transfusions. The antidote for rat bait is supplementation with vitamin K to cover the period of time that the poison prevents clotting factors from forming in your pet’s body. This can be for up to 4 weeks depending on the type of bait.

Slug and snail bait

Slug bait often comes in blue or green coloured pellets. If eaten it may cause severe seizures and high temperatures in pets, which in some cases can lead to death. As with rat bait, finding the brand of slug bait helps us work out your pet’s treatment plan and prognosis.

Treatment of slug bait poisoning involves inducing vomiting, supportive intravenous fluids, stomach flushing, and sedation or anaesthetic to control seizures.

Chocolate

It's delicious to us….. but chocolate can be deadly to pets! There is a compound in chocolate called Theobromine which is toxic to dogs. The type of chocolate, white, milk or dark is important information as different types of chocolate contain differing amounts of theobromine. Signs of ingestion include vomiting, diarrhoea, seizures. As with any suspected toxin case, you should call the veterinary clinic immediately – your pet may be made to vomit if the product has been eaten recently, or have supportive care such as intravenous fluids, anti-seizure medications. Some dogs have been known to eat whole boxes of Roses chocolates, wrappers and all!

Lilies

Along with a number of house and garden plants are beautiful to humans, but they can be deadly to our furry friends. Members of the lily family, particularly daylilies, are especially toxic to cats. Cats will chew on these plants, and all parts of the plant are toxic. Signs of toxicity are usually seen within two hours of ingestion and can include vomiting, diarrhea, and not eating. Treatment includes supportive care such as intravenous fluids, activated charcoal to absorb toxins and stomach flushing. Unfortunately no matter how small the ingestion and how aggressive the treatment these cats often develop kidney failure and may die as a result.

If you suspect they have eaten something potentially toxic please contact your vet immediately. Remember anything you can tell us can help in particular:
  • Product – Active ingredient – different types of the same product have variable times they remain active in the body.
  • Time since ingestion – Some toxins – if ingested less than 3-6 hours earlier we may be able to make your pet vomit
  • Signs – what is your pet doing in front of you right now – acting normally, acting wobbly, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures.
If you are concerned about your pet's health, please get in touch with your Anexa vet sooner, rather than later.





Date Added: Thursday, 29th April 2021


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